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Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of survey of factors affecting regeneration of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir found in the catalog.

survey of factors affecting regeneration of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir

Russell A. Ryker

survey of factors affecting regeneration of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir

by Russell A. Ryker

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  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir -- Rocky Mountains Region.,
  • Reforestation -- United States.,
  • Tree planting -- United States.,
  • Trees -- Rocky Mountains Region. -- Growth.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRussell A. Ryker.
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper INT -- 174.
    ContributionsIntermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah), United States. Forest Service.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination18, [1] p. :
    Number of Pages18
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16023019M

    A triple assault of forest impacts. Tree-killing insects have infested and killed more trees, at a faster pace, for longer periods, and over more acreage in western North America than any other known infestation.; Large wildfires have increased throughout the Rocky Mountains in recent decades. Wildfire season is now much longer — more than two months longer — than it used to be. Douglas fir use book. (Seattle, Wash.: West Coast Lumbermen's Association, ), by West Coast Lumbermen's Association (page images at HathiTrust; US access only) Die Douglas-Fichte und einige andere Nadelhölzer namentlich aus dem nordwest- lichen Amerika in .

    Easy to mistake for a common companion, Silene acaulis (Moss Campion, left) but look close and you'll see the sia petals are fused to form a tube at the base, whereas moss campion's only appear to be stamens and style of Douglasia are hidden within the petal tube, while Silene's flare out beyond the petals. Range: Found only in Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and the. Expansion of conifers into sagebrush steppe is a management concern, since conifers reduce sagebrush cover for wildlife. The primary objective of this research was to examine the relationship between the conifers, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Rocky Mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum), and two subspecies of big sagebrush, Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata spp Cited by: 1.

    Northern Rocky Mountain Forests [ Home] These two slides presented the riparian zone and showed regeneration of Douglas-fir. The (where climate is the main set of factors acting on and affecting landscape over span of geologic time). A good concise explanation of this monoclimax interpretation for beginning students is Spurr and Barnes.   Based on vegetation physiognomy, represented by five tree species, climatic data and taxonomic classification of zonal soils, we identified two vegetation geo-climatic zones: (1) a montane zone, with Rocky Mountain juniper and Douglas-fir; and (2) a subalpine zone, with Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir as climatic climax by: 6.


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Survey of factors affecting regeneration of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir by Russell A. Ryker Download PDF EPUB FB2

Survey of factors affecting regeneration of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir. Ogden, Utah: Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) A Survey of Factors Affecting Regeneration of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir USDA Forest Service research paper INT: Author: Russell A.

Ryker: Contributors: Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah), United States. Forest Service: Publisher: Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of. NATURAL REGENERATION OF INTERIOR DOUGLAS-FIR IN THE NORTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS Dennis E.

Ferguson and Clinton E. Carlson ABSTRACT The regeneration period is a crucial time in the life of a stand because it determines species composition and tree density for the new stand. Silviculturists prescribe treatments to favor adequate and timely con­.

A survey of factors affecting regeneration of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir / By Russell A. Ryker, Utah) Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden and United States.

Forest by: 6. A survey of factors affecting regeneration of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir / (Ogden, Utah: Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, ), by Russell A. Ryker, United States Forest Service, and Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah) (page images at HathiTrust). Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir Pseudotsuga menziesii 'Glauca' Sku # A favorite Christmas tree in the west. Pyramidal form in youth adapts well to shearing into a dense cone.

Sweet fragrance of crushed needles adds to its appeal. Native to the Western U.S. Evergreen. Light Needs. Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) General Description A large forest tree native to the Rocky Mountains.

Very important tree in the lumber industry. Merits further testing for adaptability to the Northern Plains environ-ment. The largest tree in North Dakota is 69 feet tall with a canopy spread of 24 feet.

Leaves File Size: KB. Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca, or Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir, is an evergreen conifer native to the interior mountainous regions of western North America, from central British Columbia and southwest Alberta in Canada southward through the United States to the far north of Mexico.

The range is continuous in the northern Rocky Mountains south to eastern Washington, eastern Oregon, Idaho Class: Pinopsida. The Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir, a smaller tree with somewhat blue-green needles, is usually considered a subspecies or variety of Douglas-fir distinct from the larger, greener Pacific Coast Douglas-firs.

The bigcone Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga macrocarpa) of southern California mountains is the only other full species of Pseudotsuga in North America. The Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca, or Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir is a large evergreen tree in the genus Pseudotsuga in the plant family Pinaceae.

The tree is native to British Columbia, Idaho and Colorado. Wikispecies has information on: Pseudotsuga Class: Pinopsida. Franco – Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir Subordinate Taxa. This plant has no children Legal Status. Threatened and Endangered Information: This plant is listed by the U.S. federal government or a state.

Common names are from state and federal lists. Click on a place name to get a complete protected plant list for that location. Most of the Rocky Mountains are undeveloped and is protected by national parks like the Rocky Mountain National Park in the U.S.

and local parks like the Banff National Park in Alberta. Despite their rugged nature though, the Rockies are a popular tourist destination for outdoor activities such as hiking, camping skiing, fishing, and : Amanda Briney. Chilling requirements for optimal growth of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir seedlings.

INT Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. 9 p. Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05 Outputs We need to increase our understanding of the basic factors and processes regulating composition, growth, development, and function of forest vegetation.

One means of increasing our understanding of these factors and processes is by examining the movement of carbon and moisture through forest ecosystems.

THE INFLUENCE OF DOUGLAS-FIR AND ROCKY MOUNTAIN JUNIPER ON WYOMING AND MOUNTAIN BIG SAGEBRUSH COVER IN SOUTHWEST MONTANA by Karen Ann Kitchen A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Animal and Range Sciences MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY Bozeman, Montana May Rocky Mountain Forests at Risk 1 [Executive Summary ] Bureau of Land Management/Bob Wick Americans revere the Rocky Mountains for their aesthetic, environmental, and economic value.

The Rockies are home to some of the crown jewels of the national park system, including Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Glacier, and Rocky Mountain National Parks. Characteristics. Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir is a large tree, typically reaching m in height and 1 m in diameter, with exceptional specimens known to 67 m tall, and 2 m commonly lives more than years and occasionally more than 1, years.

The bark on young trees is thin, smooth, gray, and covered with resin blisters. On mature trees, it is moderately thick ( cm. Range Extent. Score G - , km squared (ab, square miles). Commentsquare Kilometers from Natural Heritage Program range maps. Short-term Trend. Score F - Increasing.

Increase of >10% in population, range, area occupied, and/or number or condition of occurrences. Comment Popoulations are generally stable to increasing across the state. Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco (or (Mayr) Franco?).

Young cones with their spreading bracts coupled with the bluish-green to dark-green needles in part distinguish the interior from the coastal ber 5,Wasatch Plateau, Huntington Canyon, northwestern corner of Emery County, Utah at approx.

7, ft. elev. Vegetation Geo-climatic Zonation in the Rocky Mountains, Northern Utah, USA Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Mountain Science 11(3) March with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Five species occur in the Rocky Mountain Region (Table 1). Most of our abundant tree species Most of our abundant tree species (piñon, lodgepole and ponderosa pines, and Doug las-fir) are.Identification: This is a medium-sized to large tree.

It can be from 40 ″ to ″ tall or taller at maturity, though in Minnesota it is rarely exceeds 70 ″ in height. Principal branches are more or less ascending. Needles are bluish-green to dark green or grayish-green and have a strong odor when crushed.Rocky Mountain National Park - Ecosystems of Rocky Teacher Guide Introduction An ecosystem, an interaction of biologic communities with the surrounding physical environment, can be as small as a cubic centimeter of soil or as big as the ocean floor.

The four ecosystems of.